Monday, January 19, 2015

Starbright

"Comet Crash" by Ben Crowder on Wikimedia Commons

When the star fell it didn't glimmer
There was no oxygen in the atmosphere
No hydrogen to feed the fire
Until the final moment it had crashed
Landed right in the back yard
At first there was a loud bang
Then a sudden rush of air swept through
Like a wave of exhaustion
Followed by a sudden moment of silence.


The satellite was an anomaly
Made up of elements unknown
Metallic slivers shed from the surface
Uncovering a crust like the moon
It smelled of sulfur and black ash
Even though there was no ignition
As if it was an invisible burn
But it never left a single mark
Except for a gravel and dirt trail.

In moments it suddenly burst with light
Blinding the eyes as it burnt bright
And when the evolution was all over
All the dusty settled what remained
A husk of the future's past
Like a magical plague-like virus
It clumped into an iron shell
Rotated in rapid circles left and right
Wiping clean the universal seams.

Straight from a science fiction movie
This miniature planet took heed
It's name a traveler in the stars
And once it landed upon this earth
So too did it bring all of its mirth
A titan bulbous and tightly strewn
Across this galaxy in colorful hues
But no pyre did it come unglued

This mystic of the falling moon.  

21 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. It is how the earth was made originally. Two rival stars clashing against one another.

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  2. A well described journey. I especially love "this mystic of the falling moon."

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    1. Thank you Sherry. I happy you could appreciate the journey. What about that line makes you like it?

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  3. The last two lines of the first stanza made grin, and say, "Yes, I know what that sounds like!"

    This reads like an news announcement. I like it.

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    1. I used to be an apprentice of journalism, so maybe some of what I learned carried on in this poem a bit.

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  4. The beauty of that collision is stunning and stinging at the same time.. not something i want in my backyard *smiles*

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    1. I think it would be cool to have a meteor crash in my back yard, just as long as it doesn't destroy my house.

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  5. A brilliant tale of our world and the stars Kenn.

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    1. There are many mysteries out there waiting to be discovered.

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    2. Also, which one of you blog's do you most frequently post to so that I may follow your posts?

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  6. Beautiful images--and I love the close here--

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    1. Thanks, I'm glad you liked it -- why did you like the closing?

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  7. A very clever idea for a poem, Kenn. And vividly portrayed, thanks. K.

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    1. Space has always astounded me. There is so much to be learned out there.

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  8. Nicely presented little sci-fi imagining.

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  9. Thanks hedgewitch, I'm glad that it was entertaining enough.

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  10. Ah, science fiction through poetry...love it. Great last line!

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    1. Something different to try genre wise. I enjoyed writing it.

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  11. Replies
    1. It has a nice magical ring to it doesn't it. I think it would describe the way Carl Sagan saw things.

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All comments would be appreciated.